Coupon Lingo & Abbreviations

 

Here’s a list of the most common terms, lingo & abbreviations you’ll find in our coupon deals and store deals posts.  At the bottom there is also some examples of how we write our deals translated into plain English, so you understand what we are talking about in our coupon match-ups.

COUPONS 

Store coupons:  These are coupons issued by  -and only valid at- a particular retailer.  You’ll find these in store circulars, news paper inserts, store websites etc. They say (usually at the top) Store Coupon or the Store name on the top of them.   These can usually be “Stacked” with manufacturer’s coupons.

 MFC:  Manufacturer’s coupon.  Coupons issued by the maker of a product.  MFCs can be used at any retailer that accepts coupons and say Manufacturer’s coupon on the top of them.

Q:  This is an abbreviation for ‘coupon.’  This might have originated in the south where people tend to pronounce it ‘kyoo-pon.’

SPECIAL COUPONS 

CAT:  Catalina-machine coupon, aka ‘catalina’.  These are the coupons that print from the separate little printer found next to each cash register, at most supermarkets.  The Catalina coupons are MFR coupons, but typically have to be used at the supermarket that you got it at.  It is always a good idea before putting your groceries on the belt, to ask the cashier if the Catalina machine is working today. 

Tearpads:  A paper pad of coupons, found here-and-there around the store aisles.  Tearpads are usually MFCs.  Don’t be greedy; take two to four and save the rest for other shoppers.  But we recommend that you always take at least 2!

Blinkies:  The high-tech version of tearpads… Coupons magically pop out from the little red machines found in random spots in the store aisles.  Blinkies are actually SmartSource (MFC) coupons; they do not double.  Don’t be greedy; take two to four and save the rest for other shoppers.  But always take at least 2!

STORE REWARDS-CREDITS 

RR: ‘Register Rewards’ (from Walgreen’s).  RRs are offered on special weekly deals.  When you purchase the advertised item (or combination of items), the RRs will print out, separately, after your receipt.  RRs can then be used, like cash, on future purchases at Walgreen’s.  Only one can be used per item, they do not cover tax, and they typically expire after 2 weeks.  

ECB:  ‘Extra-Care Bucks’ (from CVS).  ECBs are offered on certain special weekly deals.  When you purchase the advertised item (or combination of items), using your CVS extracare card, the ECBs will print out at the bottom of your receipt.  ECBs can then be used, like cash, on future purchases at CVS.  Sales tax cannot be paid with ECBs, and they typically expire in 1 month.  See our post How to shop at CVS.

+Ups:  ‘Up rewards’ (from Rite Aid).  +Ups are offered on certain special weekly deals.  When you purchase the advertised item (or combination of items), using your Rite Aid Wellness Plus card, the +Ups will print out at the bottom of your receipt.  +Ups can then be used, like cash, on future purchases at Rite Aid.  Sales tax cannot be paid with +Ups, and they typically expire in 2 weeks.  See our post How to shop at Rite Aid. 

STRATEGIES 

match-up:  Sales are good.  Coupons are good.  Sales and coupons together are even better!  A ‘match-up’ is using a coupon (or coupons) on an item that is on sale.  This strategy is what makes many of our best deals possible.

stacking:  Using a MFR coupon and a store coupon on the same product.  Most retailers allow stacking, though some cashiers don’t seem to know it. 

rolling:  This is when you earn +ups, ECBs, RRs,or cats, then use them to purchase more of the same item, thereby earning more +ups, ECBs, RRs,or cats. RRs typically do not roll.

REBATES 

MIR:  Mail in rebate.  Be sure to read the instructions for claiming a rebate carefully!  Small mistakes can make you ineligible.  Typically, a form is mailed in, along with required documents (receipt, proof-of-purchase/UPC, etc), and a rebate check will come in the mail.  It’s not a bad idea to photocopy all of the documents for your records before mailing, and to keep a list of rebates that you’ve mailed in.

SCR:  ‘Single Check Rebate.’  Rite Aid offers these special rebates on specific items every month.  Go to RiteAid.com, fill in receipt info for each eligible purchase, submit it at the end of the month, and receive a rebate check in the mail.

COUPON SOURCES 

SS:  SmartSource.  A news paper coupon insert.  Contains coupons for a variety of items.  Look for it in Sunday papers.  

RP:  Red PlumA news paper coupon insert.  Contains coupons for a variety of items  Look for it in Sunday papers. 

P&G:  Proctor and Gamble A newspaper coupon insert.  Contains coupons for P&G products only. 

GM: General Mills.  A newspaper coupon insert.  Contain coupons for GM products only.

VV: Rite Aid video values coupons.  These are Rite aid store coupons that you can print out after watching a brief video.  These can be stacked.  The videos and coupons are available for 1 month, but they don’t expire for 2 months. 

MISC LINGO & ABBREVIATIONS 

BOGO, or B1G1:  Buy one get one free 

BOGO-50%, or B1G1-50%:  Buy one get one @1/2 price (50% off) 

oyno:  ‘…on your next order.’  

oop: ‘out of pocket’ that means how much money your are actually taking out of your wallet to pay for  the products. 

wyb:  ‘when you buy…’ 

psa:  ‘prices starting at…’ 

q: coupon

mm:-  ‘money-maker.’  What’s better than free?  With mm deals, you’re getting a CAT, RR, ECB, or +UP valued at more than you paid for the item!  This is like making money to use at that particular store.

ymmv:  ‘your miles may vary,’  meaning that a deal may or may not work, depending on the particular store location, their particular policies and their particular management.

Translation of a deal:

When you read our posts you will see something like this:

Buy 2 Tropicana Orange Juice $1.99
Use 1 $1/2 Tropicana Pure Premium Product, exp. 4-30-11 (RP 03/06/11)
$1.49 each after coupon

This is telling you to:
Buy 2 Tropicana orange juice at $1.99 each
Use 1 coupon that says $1.00 off when you buy 2 Tropicana Juices, that expires on 4-30-11 that was found in the (Red Plum coupon insert found in the March 6th newspaper)

Here is another example:

Buy 1 Eggland’s Best large eggs $1.77
Use $0.35/1 Eggland’s Best Eggs, exp. 3-31-11 (SS 10/31/10)
OR Use $0.35/1 Eggland’s Best Eggs, exp. 6-30-11 (SS 01/30/11)
$1.07 for a dozen eggs!

This means for you to:
Buy 1 Eggland’s Best Eggs at $1.77 each
and use (1) .35cents off of 1 Eggland’s Best coupon from either the October 31 or January 30th Smartsource coupon newspaper insert. The $0.35 coupon doubles to $0.70 making your eggs only $1.07.

Here is another example:

Buy 2 Egg M&M’s $0.99 each
Use 1 $2/2 Mars Easter products printable  
2 for free after coupon

This means to:

Buy 2 Egg M&M’s for $0.99 each.  Use 1 $2 off when you buy 2 Mars candy printable coupons.  Click on the words in blue to bring you to the link for you to print your coupon.

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